Getting over the disappointment of the MMO

Getting over the disappointment of the MMO

In many organisations, employees are regularly surveyed using rather lengthy questionnaires about their motivation (MMO) or appreciation (MWO). The findings usually gradually find their way back to the same employees, as a delayed confirmation of the predictable outcome, namely that communication needs to be improved. The first line managers and middle management then have to deal with the findings; appreciation and motivation have once more failed to meet expectations. And they have to report on these findings and draw up an action plan in response.
The consequences of carrying out these types of surveys are often underestimated: by asking a question, you imply that you are going to do something with the answer. Nor management nor organisation are unilaterally able to influence the level of motivation and appreciation. The interests, ideas, perceptions, and behaviour of individual employees are just as decisive.
New media offer an ideal means of communicating and emphasising this shared responsibility, and instead of a one-way survey, it can open up communication in both directions: question, answer, response to the question, and so on. And not just a ritual that is repeated each year, but a continuous process of exchange.
One excellent example is the idea collector, a short but targeted survey conducted via the internet, which can be carried out extremely quickly and relatively cheaply. The idea collector asks for associations and perceptions, and the findings can provide a useful basis for a dialogue with the respondents about the implications for the organisation. Shorter, simpler, quicker, cheaper, and above all more effective because it makes people feel more involved. So there really is an alternative!

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